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Posts Tagged ‘ superfoods ’

Add these 6 superfoods to your diet this fall

Below is my blog post for Huffington Post “Add these 6 superfoods to your diet this fall.” 

You can also read it HERE.

Image courtesy of Apolonia at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Apolonia at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Fall is right around the corner and many superfoods will hit their peak season. The autumn harvest brings a wide variety of healthy and delicious produce, from winter squash and sweet potatoes to pears and apples. We also often tend to crave different foods as the seasons turn.

Here are some fall favorites to boost your health and your taste buds.

Apples

Apples are high in fiber and antioxidants while being low in calories. We have lots of varieties to choose from, from sweet to tart. Be sure to eat the skin which contains hearty-healthy flavonoids. As the weather cools off, I recommend a baked apple for dessert. Add spices, such as nutmeg and cinnamon, for an added boost of flavor and health. As an added bonus, an apple a day may even keep your prescription medication away.

Winter squash

Despite its name, winter squash is grown in the summer and harvested in the fall. I am a huge fan of butternut and acorn squash. Not only are these winter squashes nutritious, they are also versatile and, best of all, filling. One cup cooked butternut squash contains only 80 calories, over 6 grams of fiber, and is also rich in beta carotene, vitamin C, and potassium. It tastes great roasted, lightly sauteed in olive oil, or pureed into a soup. I enjoy it as a filling side dish and left overs make for a yummy late afternoon snack.

Beets

Beets are a nutrition powerhouse rich in folate, iron, and fiber. Red beets contain betalains, a powerful antioxidant which gives this veggie its deep red color. Beets offer up health benefits—helping to fight cancer, heart disease, and high blood pressure. Roasted beets make a great addition to a salad and can also be thrown into your favorite green smoothie for an added zest of nutrients and color.

Turnip greens

Greens such as turnip greens, bok choy, and kale are super nutritious and delicious. Turnip greens are one of my favorites: These greens are chock full of nutrients including vitamin K, beta-carotene, vitamin C, folate, potassium, iron, and fiber. They are also high in calcium and contribute to bone health; one cup cooked contains nearly 200 mg calcium. Saute them with a little olive oil, add them to a salad or smoothie, or add chopped turnip greens to veggie casseroles.

Pears

Pears contain a juicy and sweet flavor and are a good source of vitamin C, copper, and fiber. Pears are high in soluble fiber which helps lower “bad” (LDL) cholesterol. Pears are portable and make for an easy snack. Cooking this fruit brings out its flavor, and a poached pear is a great addition to a salad.

Sweet potatoes

A nutrition powerhouse, sweet potatoes are loaded with beta carotene and a good source of fiber, vitamin C, and potassium. I recommend roasted sweet potato wedges tossed with a drizzle of olive oil, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

Other super healthy foods to include this fall are cauliflower, figs, pomegranates, and pumpkin.

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Add more of these 5 superfoods to your diet

Legumes

It’s a new year and a great time for healthy eating and to try new foods. The foods below are not only trending now but are also healthy, delicious, and versatile. As a nutritionist, I urge you give them a try.

 

  1. Cauliflower

Move over kale; cauliflower is the “in” vegetable these days. Cauliflower is a cruciferous vegetable and a member of the brassica family alongside broccoli and Brussel sprouts. It is a nutrition powerhouse, chock full of fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate. It is also very low in calories; one cup raw cauliflower contains only 25 calories so don’t worry about eating too much.

One reason cauliflower may be making a comeback is because of its versatility. When cooked and soft, try experimenting by making cauliflower “rice or potatoes” to replace actual potatoes or rice.

 

  1. Pulses

The United Nations (UN) declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses (IYP). Pulses are comprised of dry peas, beans, lentils, and legumes and are protein-packed and sustainable vegetables.  As discussed in the recently released 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, pulses are also excellent sources of dietary fiber and nutrients, including potassium and the B vitamin folate. They also contain iron and zinc and are a terrific protein choice if you are vegetarian or just interested in cutting back on meat.

Adding pulses to your diet is easy. You can enjoy a split pea soup, throw a handful of chick peas into your salad, or make a delicious lentil stew instead of a meat dish. Ready to incorporate more pulses into your diet? Visit pulsepledge.com to take a 10-week challenge and get access to recipes, meal plans and other resources.

 

  1. Beets

This long lost vegetable is certainly trending now. Eating more beets is good for you and can certainly help boost your nutrient intake.  Beets contain betalains, a potent antioxidant which can help fight off oxidative stress. Beets are also high in fiber, folate, potassium, and magnesium.  This naturally sweet and tasty vegetable also contains anti-inflammatory properties, which can help fight chronic disease such as heart disease, hypertension, inflammation and cancer.

 

  1. Spiralized Vegetables

Spiralizing is a great way to use veggies in different ways, and can certainly help boost your intake. A “spiralizer” is a spiral vegetable slicer that creates strands (resembling pasta) out of vegetables like zucchini, sweet potato, and carrots. You can swap pasta for spiralized zucchini to save lots of calories. And what I love is that you get to eat a bigger portion. While one cup of cooked linguine contains around 200 calories, two cups of cooked veggies like carrots and zucchini contain under 100 calories. You can also add spiralized veggies to your favorite salad or stir-fry for a healthy side dish. It is a great gadget to add to your kitchen.

 

  1. Hemp Seeds

These nutty seeds are rich in protein, fiber, and omega-3 fatty acids.  Use them like you would wheat germ or seeds – sprinkle them on yogurt, oatmeal and other cereals for added flavor, crunch, and nutrients. You can also add them to salads and to sautéed vegetables. You can even use hemp seeds instead of bread crumbs to make a healthy crust for fish or chicken.

 

This post was sponsored by USA Pulses & Pulse Canada. 

Photo courtesy of: USDA/ARS, Keith Weller.

 

 

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