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Posts Tagged ‘ whole grains ’

Enjoy these 5 whole grains for better health

Below is my post for Huffington Post: “Enjoy these 5 whole grains for better health”

You can also read it HERE.

September is back to school time and the start of the fall season. It is also Whole Grains Month and there’s lots of reason to celebrate. Including whole grains in your diet is a great way to boost nutrient intake. Whole grains are packed with vitamins and minerals including folate, vitamin E, magnesium, selenium, and protective phytonutrients. Research shows that eating whole grains instead of refined grains lowers the risk of chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and certain cancers.

Including whole grains in your diet can also help with weight loss despite the Paleo movement and low-carb enthusiasts who shun even the healthiest of grains. Whole grains are actually relatively low in calories (approximately 80-100 calories per ½ cup serving) and are also rich in fiber which helps you feel full (and, therefore, stop eating!)

Despite the health benefits of whole grains, and the recommendations to eat at least half of your grains as whole grains (3 whole grain servings daily for a 2000 calorie diet), most Americans eat fewer than one serving per day. And, instead, we fill up on refined grains (yes, white bread products) which are devoid of fiber and other important nutrients.

Next time you decide which starchy carbohydrate to eat, I suggest you skip the white pasta and white rice and include healthy grains instead: brown rice, amaranth, quinoa, kasha, farro, whole corn, millet, whole wheat pasta, and kamut to name a few. If you happen to be following a gluten-free diet, no problem, as many terrific and versatile grains are now readily available on the market.

These healthy and tasty whole grains are worth placing at the top of your shopping list.

Quinoa

Quinoa, technically a seed and not a grain, is a nutrition treasure and has a protein content that is superior to that of most grains, because it contains all the essential amino acids. It is high in the amino acid lysine, which is important for tissue growth and repair. It is also rich in the minerals iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and copper, and a great choice if you are eating a gluten-free diet. Quinoa is also high in the antioxidants quercetin and kaempferol which are thought to protect against a range of chronic diseases. And it contains 5 grams of fiber per one cup serving. It is also versatile and can be added to salads, veggie burgers and chili. And, it is gluten free.

Buckwheat

Buckwheat brought to America by Russian and Polish immigrants who called it “kasha,” is a good source of the minerals manganese, magnesium, and zinc, as well as flavonoids like quercetin and rutin, which contain antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A great choice for those following a gluten-free diet, one cup of cooked kasha contains five grams of fiber.

Growing up, my grandmother used to make kasha varnishkes — kasha, bow tie noodles, onions and fat. This version is not gluten free unless you use gluten free noodles. Unless it’s a nostalgic occasion, for a healthier version, I suggest sticking with the kasha and skipping the bow tie noodles.

Whole corn

Fresh corn on the cob. Popcorn. Corn cakes. Polenta. Yes, corn is a whole grain and can be extremely healthy for you when it’s whole. A good source of B vitamins, magnesium, and phosphorus, whole corn is high in fiber and gluten free. Contrary to popular belief, whole corn is not high in calories; a corn on the cob contains around 100 calories. Yellow corn is also high in antioxidants. One of my summer favorites: fresh corn on the cob from the Farmer’s market.

Oats

Enjoying oatmeal for breakfast is one of the most common ways to eat oats. Not only does it taste delicious, it is also filling, chock full of fiber, and lower in calories and sugar than many breakfast cereals. Oat bran is particularly high in the soluble fiber β-glucan which has been shown to reduce cholesterol levels, making it a great choice to prevent heart disease. Oats also contains magnesium and potassium, two minerals also good for your heart.

Farro

Farro is an ancient wheat grain that originated in Mesopotamia. Though we refer to farro as if it were one just grain, the term is Italian for “ancient wheat grain” and is often used to describe three different grains: farro piccolo (einkorn), farro medio (emmer), and farro grande (spelt). Emmer wheat is the kind that is most commonly found in the U.S and Europe and it is sometimes confused with spelt, an entirely different type of grain.

Farro has a nutty flavor and a chewy texture and is a healthy alternative to popular grains, such as rice and quinoa. It is yummy as an ingredient in stews, salads and soups. It is very nutritious, rich in protein and fiber, magnesium, zinc, B vitamins, and antioxidants. Best to choose whole farro as opposed to the pearled variety.

 

Next time you have the urge to include refined white products at your next meal or skip the grain family altogether, think again and include these super foods on your plate. Here’s your permission slip to eat more carbs…the healthy way.

Want recipes, tips, and ideas on how to prepare whole grains? We’ve got you covered.

The Oldways Whole Grain Council (WGC) offers recipes and tip sheets on preparing whole grains.

No time to cook? No problem! My nutrition colleague, Ellie Krieger, award winning author, and producer and host of the cooking series “Ellie’s Real Good Food,” rounds up some new products that make whole grains a cinch to prepare.

Want to wake up with whole grains tomorrow morning? This expert roundup (me included) offers unique and novel ways to incorporate whole grains in to your breakfast routine.

Here’s to a healthy fall.

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10 Simple Tips to Savor the Flavor of Eating Right

Below is my blog post “10 tips to savor the flavor of eating right.”

You can also read it on Huffington Post HERE.

NNM2016

National nutrition month (NNM) is a nutrition education campaign sponsored yearly by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). This year’s NNM theme is Savor the Flavor of Eating Right.

Here are smart tips to help you eat healthier this month.

1. Mind your portions and eat slowly.

One of the best ways to “savor the flavor” is to chew our food well instead of shoveling it in. This will not only help us eat less, but we will be able to actually taste and enjoy what we are eating.

2. Include fruits and vegetables at each meal.

Sprinkle in berries to your yogurt, add a colorful green salad to your lunch, and include vegetables with your dinner.

3. Eat a variety of foods from each food group.

Sorry Paleo lovers, but it really is best to include foods from all the food groups.

4. Aim for color!

Choosing a colorful variety of fruits and vegetables is best, as different antioxidants exist in the different color spectrums. The deep red pigment found in tomatoes and watermelon contains the antioxidant lycopene, for example. The deep orange color found in cantaloupe and sweet potatoes contains beta carotene.

5. Enjoy whole grains.

The recently release 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines, as in previous editions, suggest that half of our grains be whole grains. Healthy whole grains include brown rice, whole wheat bread, and oatmeal.

6. Include plant based proteins such as beans, peas, and legumes.

These pulses not only give you protein, but they have an added bonus as they are chock full of fiber, vitamins and minerals.

7. Spice it up.

Adding in spices to your favorite foods will not only enhance the flavor, but it will boost your nutrient intake. And adding spices helps to reduce your need to use added sugar and salt.

8. Snack on nuts.

Adding nuts as a midafternoon snack will not give your diet a boost of nutrients while also filling you up. So you may end up eating less later, a great boost for weight loss!

9. Try new foods.

A huge assortment of whole foods are available to us. But we often get into a rut and stick with the usual fare. Give a new food a try and savor the flavor. You may actually love it!

10. Get outdoors.

Spring is coming, so use this as an opportunity to get more active and take advantage of outdoor activities such as walking and bike riding.

We would love to hear your favorite springtime tips.

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Smart food swaps for a healthier 2014

Below is my blog post for Huffington Post “Smart food swaps for a healthier 2014.”

You can also read it HERE.

It’s that time of year — a new year and a new beginning. As a nutritionist, I often hear from new clients that they make New Year’s resolutions early January and by Valentine’s Day, they are discouraged and back to their same old patterns. Resolutions such as, “I have to lose weight” or, “I want to eat healthier” tend to be too broad, and therefore do not generally work. What I have found in my private practice is that small action-oriented steps and simple substitutions tend to work a lot better.

Here are some smart-and simple food swaps that you can actually implement and incorporate into your everyday routine to help you lead a healthier life.

1. Choose whole fruit instead of juice.

Juice tends to be high in sugar and low in fiber. Fresh fruit, on the other hand, contains more fiber than the juice and has a higher water content, both which are excellent for weight loss. Eating an orange instead of guzzling down a pint of orange juice can save you over 150 calories. Imagine how many calories you can save if you make this switch daily.

2. Start your day with a low fat Greek yogurt instead of a doughnut.

Greek yogurt is an excellent breakfast as it is high in protein, which can keep you full longer. Top your yogurt with fresh fruit and a handful of walnuts to round out your breakfast. A doughnut, on the other hand, is full of calories without much nutrition.

3. Choose whole grains instead of refined grains.

Grains and starches are not taboo and do not need to be avoided to be healthier and lose some weight in the process. The trick is to eat the right kind of grains. Whole grains are the best choice as they are chock full of nutrients and fiber. Include brown rice, quinoa, and oatmeal instead of white bread, white rice, and white pasta.

4. Drink water and seltzer instead of soda.

Soda contains pure sugar, is liquid candy, and a waste of calories. Why not eat your calories instead of drink them? Swapping soda for water or seltzer can save you hundreds of calories. For flavor, add a splash of lemon, orange, or cucumber or throw in a few fruity ice cubes (pour your favorite juice into an ice cube tray and freeze for flavored ice cubes).

5. Eat an English muffin (whole grain, of course) instead of a bagel.

Making this swap can save you over 200 calories. While both a bagel and an English muffin are just one item, a bagel is equivalent to approximately five bread slices whereas an English muffin is more like two bread slices. Save the bagel as an occasional treat.

6. Start your meal with a vegetable salad (dressing on side) instead of a fried appetizer.

Starting your meal with a fresh salad is a great way to include vegetables into your diet. Salad and vegetables are high in vitamins and minerals, full of fiber, and low in calories.

7. Choose a low-fat tomato-based soup instead of a cream-based soup.

I am a soup lover. I enjoy eating soup in the cold winters in NY and also in the summer. Soups make a great snack, a healthy appetizer, and even a great meal. The key is to eat a vegetable based soup and to skip the cream. Great choices include 10 vegetable soup, minestrone soup, and white bean and escarole soup.

8. Eat an apple or a pear as a snack instead of a bag of chips.

When you feel the urge to nibble, go for a healthy piece of fruit instead of a bag of chips.

9. Choose salmon instead of steak.

I advise limiting read meat and choosing fish instead. Grilled salmon, for example, is high in protein, much lower in saturated fat than red meat, and full of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

10. Finish your meal with a cup of blueberries instead of a slice of blueberry pie.

Berries are rich in antioxidants, fiber, and other nutrients and low in calories. If you want to indulge in an occasional slice of pie, make it a sliver, and surround it with a cup of fresh fruit.

Here’s to a happy and healthy 2014!

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Lessons from the Mediterranean diet: 10 foods to eat

Below is my latest blog post  for Huffington Post: ” What we can learn from the Mediterranean Diet: 10 healthy foods to eat.” You can also read it here.

The Mediterranean diet is a heart-healthy eating plan that has been thought to reduce the incidence of heart disease. Now a large study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on thousands of participants in Spain confirms the health benefits of this eating plan. The study found that those following the Mediterranean diet had a 30 percent reduction in the chance of having a heart attack or stroke. The study subjects were people ages 55-80 who had a high risk for cardiovascular disease.

As reported in the New York Times, “About 30 percent of heart attacks, strokes and deaths from heart disease can be prevented in people at high risk if they switch to a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruits and vegetables, and even drink wine with meals.” The study was stopped early because the results were so clear-cut that they found it not ethical to continue.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating plan that is high in fruits and vegetables, and includes whole grains, olive oil, fish, nuts, beans, and legumes. It is low in foods that are high in saturated fats — such as meat and butter — and is also low in processed foods. What I love about the Mediterranean diet is that it is not touted as a weight-loss diet, but rather as a healthy lifestyle plan and a way life.

I previously wrote about the benefits of eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables and rich in whole grains.

So how can we Americans eat more like the Greeks? We can eat more fresh fruits and vegetables, include fish instead of meat, use olive oil instead of butter, and snack on nuts instead of chips.

My clients have been asking me which foods they can include in their diet. Here are some winners.

Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fat, a heart-healthy fat. Diets high in olive oil have been associated with heart health. Olive oil is also rich in antioxidants, including vitamin E, polyphenols, and beta-carotene, which protects blood vessels and other components of the heart. Drizzle olive oil on salads and steamed veggies.

Tuna is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which have been associated with a decrease in the risk of heart disease risk. The American Heart Association recommends including at least two servings of fish per week, in particular fatty fish. Tuna is affordable, convenient, and versatile. Throw canned tuna on a salad, make a sandwich, or toss it into whole wheat pasta, to get a dose of omega-3s.

Broccoli is one of my favorite vegetables as it is chock-full of the antioxidant vitamins A and C. It is a cruciferous vegetable, and part of the Brassica family, rich in phytochemicals, known to have antioxidant properties. Sautee broccoli in olive oil and enjoy it as a side dish.

Raspberries contain the antioxidant quercetin — which contains anti-inflammatory benefits — and the phenolic compound ellagic acid, and can help fight heart disease. And even more good news: One cup contains only 105 calories and eight grams of fiber. Throw some berries into your morning yogurt for added color, taste, and a healthy dose of antioxidants and fiber.

Walnuts not only taste great, but also provide a heart-healthy addition to your diet. Rich in the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid, and antioxidants such as selenium, walnuts also provide protein, fiber, magnesium and phosphorus to the diet. Include a handful of walnuts as a snack or toss a few tablespoons into your breakfast oatmeal.

Chickpeas are a great option for plant protein and fiber. They also contain magnesium, manganese, iron, and folate. Hummus, which is made from chickpeas, is delicious with crackers or veggies as an afternoon snack.

Brown rice contains fiber, B-vitamins, and a variety of minerals. It contains nearly three times the fiber of white rice. A half-cup serving of cooked brown rice contains nearly a half-day’s worth of the mineral manganese, which works with various enzymes facilitating body processes. Brown rice makes a healthy grain to include with a meal of grilled fish and vegetables.

Spinach contains the minerals iron and potassium, as well as vitamins A, C, K, and the B-vitamin folate. Spinach also contains flavonoids, which have antioxidant properties that may prevent against certain diseases. For good news, it is available year-round, offering a readily-available source of many vitamins and minerals. A fresh spinach salad drizzled with olive oil and a handful of nuts tastes great.

Blueberries are rich in antioxidants and vitamin C and may benefit heart health. Consuming blueberries may keep your blood pressure in check. Blueberries contain anthocyanins, which may reduce the risk of heart disease in women. Snack on these tasty berries or throw a handful into your cereal.

Lentils contain soluble fiber, protein, and complex carbohydrates and also offers the added benefit of being a significant source of iron. Consider beginning your lunch or dinner with a hot lentil soup.

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